Let's Take Selfies

 

THEY SAY THAT LIFE IMITATES ART FAR MORE THAN ART IMITATES LIFE. WHICH IS EXACTLY WHAT HAPPENED WHEN WE DEBUTED A BRONZE STATUE OF TWO GIRLS TAKING A SELFIE IN OUR TOWN SQUARE. IT GAINED INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION—BECAUSE THESE ARE THE IMPORTANT THINGS IN LIFE, AND PEOPLE WERE UP IN ARMS, IN BOTH APPROVAL AND DISDAIN.

Days have since passed and every time I walk by this statue, I see people flocking towards it to take photos with it. But all the attention on this selfie statue brought up the interesting topic of whether selfies are good or bad. Are we really get more narcissistic? Or are we just more transparent about it with the use and virality of social media? What does that say about painted portraits or the marble statues of people from history? Think about that because I see it sinking in.

 

Double-edged Sword

Like anything humans touch, it can be both good and bad. Selfies are just another form of capturing a memory. Sure, you could ask someone to take your photo for you, but why entrust someone else's photographing skills when you can just do it yourself? And like anything in life, I think selfies are perfectly fine in moderation. If you love how you look and it looks good, why not share it? But don't come for me—there's a difference between posting selfies and posting pictures of yourself. I'm the latter.

That doesn’t mean only post selfies on Instagram. Unfollow. That’s just not interesting.

This Isn't New

It's funny now because I clearly remember me and my friends taking selfies way before it became somewhat socially acceptable. I have the iPhone 4S to thank. I remember that feeling of 'I'm holding out my phone, taking a photo of myself and I hope people don't stare' whenever I took a quick snap. It would feel a little embarrassing, and five years later, that feeling has completely vanished. With general acceptance from the public, Snapchat, and the globalization of selfies with the help of public figures and celebrities, they are here to stay.

So get over it and snap away.